Be the Bipartisanship you want to see in the World by Supporting our next President

October 19th, 2012 by Ravi Iyer

The point of politics is to make people’s lives better.  Liberals and conservatives may disagree about how to do that, but despite the heated rhetoric, there are a number of broad goals that most anyone would agree upon.  Consider a survey we recently conducted concerning liberal and conservative preferences about the kind of place they would like to live.  While there are differences in terms of priorities, the top 5 desirable attributes are largely the same.  Everyone wants a strong economy, safety, clean air and water, and good medical care.

Top 5 Desirable attributes in a city by ideology:

Unfortunately, roughly half of the country is going to be disappointed by the results of the next presidential election.  Both history and psychology tell us that this disappointment will likely lead to some amount of demonization of whomever wins, reflexive opposition, and incivility.  This may lead to outcomes that nobody wants, such as what occurred during the debt ceiling negotiations.

Thoughtful liberals, conservatives, and both presidential candidates have talked about the need to transcend partisanship in order to attempt to create better policy and a better country.  The results of the next election are likely to disappoint some of these thoughtful people, yet it also represents an opportunity for them to be the change they wish to see in the world, by consciously resisting the impulse toward demonization and reflexive opposition.  It represents an opportunity to back up words of bipartisanship with action, at a powerful moment when everybody will expect the opposite.

Supporting our next president does not mean that you need to support their policies.  We can disagree without being disagreeable.  But supporting our next president does mean that we hope they succeed at goals that we all share such as creating a safer, cleaner, healthier, and more prosperous world.  It means hoping that the unemployment rate goes down, not up.  It means hoping that the poor receive the help they need, whether by charity or government, and that terrorism is stopped, whether by military or diplomatic means.  Whomever wins, let’s support them by truly hoping they succeed at our shared goals.

If this resonates with you, consider joining our facebook group and pass this message on to your friends.  Positive change always starts with small groups of people who believe in something.

Posted in bipartisanship, civil politics, debt ceiling, demonization, incivility, liberals and conservatives, news commentary, next presidential election, partisanship, political psychology, yourmorals.org1 Comment »

One Response to “Be the Bipartisanship you want to see in the World by Supporting our next President”

  1. Daryl Kulok says:

    Yes! It’s about time. The actor John Wayne was an active republican. After the 1960 election he said “I didn’t vote for him but he’s my president and I hope he does a good job”.

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